Archive for December, 2010

I wish, my brothers and sisters, that during this year you may live nearer to Christ than you have ever done before. Depend upon it, it is when we think much of Christ that we think little of ourselves, little of our troubles, and little of the doubts and fears that surround us. Begin from this day, and may God help you. Never let a single day pass over your head without a visit to the garden of Gethsemane, and the cross on Calvary. And as for some of you who are not saved, and know not the Redeemer, I would to God that this very day you would come to Christ. I dare say you think coming to Christ is some terrible thing: that you need to be prepared before you come; that he is hard and harsh with you. When men have to go to a lawyer they need to tremble; when they have to go to the doctor they may fear; though both those persons, however unwelcome, may be often necessary. But when you come to Christ, you may come boldly. There is no fee required; there is no preparation necessary. You may come just as you are. It was a brave saying of Martin Luther’s, when he said, “I would run into Christ’s arms even if he had a drawn sword in his hand.” Now, he has not a drawn sword, but he has his wounds in his hands. Run into his arms, poor sinner. “Oh,” you say, “May I come?” How can you ask the question? you are commanded to come. The great command of the gospel is, “Believe on the Lord Jesus.” Those who disobey this command disobey God. It is as much a command of God that man should believe on Christ, as that we should love our neighbor. Now, what is a command I have certainly a right to obey. There can be no question you see; a sinner has liberty to believe in Christ because he is told to do so. God would not have told him to do a thing which he must not do. You are allowed to believe. “Oh,” saith one, “that is all I want to know. I do believe that Christ is able to save to the uttermost. May I rest my soul on him, and say, sink or swim, most blessed Jesus, thou art my Lord?” May do it! man? Why you are commanded to do it. Oh that you may be enabled to do it. Remember, this is not a thing which you will do at a risk. The risk is in not doing it. Cast yourself on Christ, sinner. Throw away every other dependence and rest alone on him.

Around every corner is the lure to consume. A desire to be satisfied. Unfortunately no human being has found anything under the sun that brings satisfaction. So we consume more, and more, and more.  Eventually, we overdose. However, there is hope–if Christianity is our Rehab. In Jesus, satisfaction can be found. Grace, love, peace and hope can be found…and there is always more. Consume more of Jesus. Overdose. 

Rehab: The Overdose officially hits stores and online outlets 1.11.11.

Check out the promo video below.

http://www.youtube.com/v/zddWvPsWUqI?fs=1&hl=en_US

Also, place your order today so you can be among the first to get an extra dose! 

To pre-order Rehab: The Overdose album go here.

To pre-order Rehab: The Overdose combo packages go here.

To pre-order the new The Overdose Tshirt go here.

Get ready for The Overdose on 1.11.11!

 

As a lifelong Cub fan this is sad news.This from ESPN……

CHICAGO — Ron Santo, a legend in Chicago as a former Cubs third baseman-turned-wildly popular announcer, died Thursday in Arizona. He was 70.

Santo

According to WGN, Santo died from complications of bladder cancer. Santo was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 18 and later lost both legs to amputation.

Santo was expected to work the coming season as an analyst for the Cubs flagship radio broadcast on WGN-AM 720.

In a statement Friday, Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts praised Santo for “his passion, his loyalty, high great personal courage and his tremendous sense of humor.”

Santo will always be “the heart and soul of Cubs fans,” Ricketts said. The team plans to celebrate Santo’s contributions to the franchise in the coming days.

Santo played for the Cubs from 1960-73 before finishing his career with the White Sox in 1974. He became a Cubs broadcaster in 1990.

Santo was the quintessential Cubs fan and made no apologies for his on-air cheerleading or his utter frustration over a Cub’s misplay.

Santo never witnessed his longtime goal of election to the Baseball Hall of Fame despite career numbers that mark him as one of baseball’s all-time great third basemen. He finished with a .277 average over 15 major league seasons, with 342 home runs and 1,331 RBIs.

Santo was up for the Hall of Fame on 19 occasions, and first appeared on the Veterans Committee ballot in 2003.

Though Santo came close to Cooperstown enshrinement in the last decade in voting by the Veterans Committee, he always fell short. In 2007, Santo received 39 of the 48 votes necessary to reach the 75 percent threshold of the living 64 Hall of Famers to cast a ballot. His 61 percent led all candidates and no one was elected to the Hall.

It was the fourth straight time the Veterans Committee had failed to elect a member, leaving Santo frustrated.

“I thought it was going to be harder to deal with, but it wasn’t,” he said that day. “I’m just kind of fed up with it. I figure, ‘Hey, it’s not in the cards.’ But I don’t want to go through this every two years. It’s ridiculous.”

Santo was consistent that he did not want to make a posthumous entrance into the Hall of Fame. After being denied so many times, he was resigned to what is now the only possibility.

“(Induction) wasn’t going to change my life,” he said. “I’m OK. But I know I’ve earned it.”

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.